NEPAssist Map Layer Information

Sites Reporting to EPA

Water Monitors

Places

Transportation

NonAttainment Area

Water Features

Boundaries

Demographics 2010 (ACS)

Demographics 2000

Soil Survey Map

NWI Wetlands

USA Topo Map

National Land Cover 2006

Sites Reporting to EPA

Hazardous Waste (RCRAInfo)

Description: Hazardous waste is waste that is dangerous or potentially harmful to our health or the environment. Hazardous wastes can be liquids, solids, gases, or sludges. They can be discarded commercial products, like cleaning fluids or pesticides, or the by-products of manufacturing processes.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

Air emissions (AFS)

Description: The Air Facility System (AFS) contains compliance and permit data for stationary sources regulated by EPA, state, and local air pollution agencies. States use AFS information to prepare State Implementation Plans (SIP) and track the compliance status of point sources with various regulatory programs under the Clean Air Act.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

Water dischargers (PCS/ICIS)

Description: As authorized by the Clean Water Act, the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit program controls water pollution by regulating sources, such as municipal and industrial wastewater treatment facilities, that discharge pollutants into waters of the United States. EPA tracks water discharge permits through the Permit Compliance System (PCS) and Integrated Compliance Information System (ICIS) databases, which includes information on when a permit was issued and when it expires, how much the company is permitted to discharge, and the actual monitoring data showing what the company has discharged.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

Toxic releases (TRI)

Description: The Toxics Release Inventory (TRI) is a publicly available EPA database that contains information on toxic chemical releases and waste management activities reported annually by certain industries as well as federal facilities. The database also contains links to compliance and enforcement information.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

Superfund (CERCLIS)

Description: Superfund is the federal government's program to clean up the nation's uncontrolled hazardous waste sites. The National Priorities List (NPL) is the list of national priorities among the known releases or threatened releases of hazardous substances, pollutants, or contaminants throughout the United States and its territories.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

Brownfields (ACRES)

Description: The Assessment, Cleanup and Redevelopment Exchange System (ACRES) captures grantee reported data on environmental activities and accomplishments (assessment, cleanup and redevelopment), funding, job training, and details on cooperative partners and leveraging efforts - a central objective of the Brownfields Program. The information in ACRES is provided at the property and grant level.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

RADInfo

Description: RADInfo includes facility information for facilities regulated by the USEPA for radiation and radioactivity (Code of Federal Regulation (CFR) parts: 40 CFR Parts 191 and 194; 40 CFR Part 61; and 40 CFR Part 300). 40 CFR Parts 191 and 194 are EPA's regulations governing the Department of Energy's Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (Part 194) and the management and disposal of spent nuclear fuel, and high-level and transuranic radioactive wastes (Part 191). EPA's regulations limiting the amount of radiation that can be released into the air from a number of different types of facilities are contained in 40 CFR Part 61, Subparts B, H, I, K, Q, R, T, and W. 40 CFR 300 establishes EPA's National Priority List (NPL), and RADInfo only contains information on radioactively-contaminated NPL sites.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA)

Description: The Toxic Substances Control Act of 1976 provides EPA with authority to require reporting, record-keeping and testing requirements, and restrictions relating to chemical substances and/or mixtures. Certain substances are generally excluded from TSCA, including, among others, food, drugs, cosmetics and pesticides. TSCA addresses the production, importation, use, and disposal of specific chemicals including polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), asbestos, radon and lead-based paint.

Source: EPA Envirofacts Data Source

Date: Refer to Envirofacts Data Update

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Water Monitors

USGS water monitors (NWIS)

Description: The USGS water monitors layer is retrieved in real-time from the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Water Information System (NWIS) website. The NWIS service provides current conditions from selected surface water, ground water, and water quality sites.

Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Water Information System (NWIS)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

EPA water monitors (STORET)

Description: Water quality monitoring information comes from EPA's Storage and Retrieval (STORET) System, a repository of physical, chemical and biological monitoring data from state and federal agencies, watershed organizations, volunteer groups and many others. Surface water, Ground water, and Others are general categories for more specific STORET Station Types.

Source: EPA's Storage and Retrieval (STORET) System

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

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Places (GNIS Points)

The Geographic Names Information System (GNIS) is a database that contains name and locative information about more than two million physical and cultural features located throughout the United States and its territories.

Schools

Description: Building or group of buildings used as an institution for study, teaching, and learning (e.g., academy, college, high school, university).

Source: U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

Hospitals

Description: Building where the sick or injured may receive medical or surgical attention (e.g., infirmary, clinic).

Source: U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

Worship Places

Description: Building used for religious worship (e.g., chapel, mosque, synagogue, tabernacle, temple).

Source: U.S. Geological Survey Geographic Names Information System (GNIS)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

National Register of Historic Places

Description: The National Register of Historic Places is the official list of the nation's historic places worthy of preservation. Authorized by the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, the National Register is the official Federal list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects significant in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture. The National Register is managed and maintained by the National Park Service (NPS) and directed by the Keeper of the National Register. National Register properties may be significant because of their importance to local and state communities; their significance can also stem from their importance to the history and shared patrimony of the nation. Nominations for listing historic properties generally come from State Historic Preservation Officers; Federal Preservation Officers for properties owned or controlled by the United States Government; and, Tribal Historic Preservation Officers for properties on Tribal lands. Private individuals and organizations, local governments, and tribal members often initiate this process and prepare the necessary documentation which goes through a rigorous review process by the NPS prior to official listing in the National Register, National Historic Landmarks are those historic properties on the National Register that have been recognized for their exceptional significance in the history of the United States and are afforded special protections under Federal law.

Source: U.S. Department of the Interior National Park Service

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

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Transportation

Airports Point

Description: The Airport point layer is public use airports extracted from The Public- Use Airports database of the National Transportation Atlas Databases-2001 (NTAD-2001), published by the Department of Transportation, Bureau of Transportation Statistics.

Source: National Transportation Atlas Database

Spatial Metadata: Airports Point

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

Airports Polygon

Description: Airports Polygon represents airport boundaries and airport runways within the United States. All airports have a boundary and most have at least one runway.

Source: National Transportation Atlas Database

Spatial Metadata: Airports Polygon

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

Railroads

Description: Railroads are linear features representing the nation's railway system at a 1:100,000 scale. The railroads layer is produced by the Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) and distributed as part of the National Transportation Atlas (NTAD). Note that, due to source differences and the inclusion of historical rail lines and rights of way, there may be differences in location and coverage between this layer and the railroads depicted in the Virtual Earth basemap layer.

Source: Federal Railroad Administration

Spatial Metadata: Railroads

Date: 2007

NonAttainment Area

In United States environmental law, a nonattainment area is an area considered to have air quality worse than the National Ambient Air Quality Standards as defined in the Clean Air Act. Nonattainment areas must have and implement a plan to meet the standard. An area may be a nonattainment area for one pollutant and an attainment area for others. To view the currently designated nonattainment areas for all criteria pollutants listed by state and county, click here.

Ozone 8-hour (by 1997 standard)

Description: Ozone (O3) is a gas composed of three oxygen atoms. Ground-level or "bad" ozone is not emitted directly into the air, but is created by chemical reactions between oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the presence of sunlight. Emissions from industrial facilities and electric utilities, motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents are some of the major sources of NOx and VOC.

Source: Ground-level Ozone, EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS)

Spatial Metadata: NAA Ozone 8-hour (by 1997 standard)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

Ozone 8-hour (by 2008 standard)

Description: Ozone (O3) is a gas composed of three oxygen atoms. Ground-level or "bad" ozone is not emitted directly into the air, but is created by chemical reactions between oxides of nitrogen (NOx) and volatile organic compounds (VOC) in the presence of sunlight. Emissions from industrial facilities and electric utilities, motor vehicle exhaust, gasoline vapors, and chemical solvents are some of the major sources of NOx and VOC.

Source: Ground-level Ozone, EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS)

Spatial Metadata: NAA Ozone 8-hour (by 2008 standard)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

Lead (by 2008 standard)

Description: Lead (Pb) is a metal found naturally in the environment as well as in manufactured products. The major sources of lead emissions have historically been from fuels in on-road motor vehicles (such as cars and trucks) and industrial sources. As a result of EPA's regulatory efforts to remove lead from on-road motor vehicle gasoline, emissions of lead from the transportation sector dramatically declined by 95 percent between 1980 and 1999, and levels of lead in the air decreased by 94 percent between 1980 and 1999. Today, the highest levels of lead in air are usually found near lead smelters. The major sources of lead emissions to the air today are ore and metals processing and piston-engine aircraft operating on leaded aviation gasoline.

Source: Lead, EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS)

Spatial Metadata: NAA PB

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

PM2.5 Annual (by 1997 standard)

Description: These areas exceed the 1997 annual design value for PM 2.5.

"Particulate matter," also known as particle pollution or PM, is a complex mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets. Particle pollution is made up of a number of components, including acids (such as nitrates and sulfates), organic chemicals, metals, and soil or dust particles.

"Fine particles," such as those found in smoke and haze, are 2.5 micrometers in diameter and smaller. These particles known as PM 2.5 can be directly emitted from sources such as forest fires, or they can form when gases emitted from power plants, industries and automobiles react in the air.

Source: Particulate Matter, EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS)

Spatial Metadata: NAA PM 2.5 (by 1997 standard)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

PM2.5 24-hour (by 2006 standard)

Description: These areas exceed the 2006 24-hour design value for PM 2.5.

"Particulate matter," also known as particle pollution or PM, is a complex mixture of extremely small particles and liquid droplets. Particle pollution is made up of a number of components, including acids (such as nitrates and sulfates), organic chemicals, metals, and soil or dust particles.

"Fine particles," such as those found in smoke and haze, are 2.5 micrometers in diameter and smaller. These particles, known as PM 2.5, can be directly emitted from sources such as forest fires, or they can form when gases emitted from power plants, industries and automobiles react in the air.

Source: Particulate Matter, EPA Office of Air and Radiation, Office of Air Quality Planning and Standards (OAQPS)

Spatial Metadata: NAA PM 2.5 (by 2006 standard)

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

Water Features

Impaired Streams

Description: Streams that have excess pollutants and are not clean enough to support recreational uses.

Source: EPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds (OWOW)

Spatial Metadata: Impaired Streams

Date: 2009

Impaired Water Bodies

Description: Water bodies that have excess pollutants and are not clean enough to support recreational uses.

Source: EPA Office of Wetlands, Oceans, and Watersheds (OWOW)

Spatial Metadata: Impaired Water Bodies

Date: 2009

Streams

Description: Streams are linear surface water features. The streams layer is based on the National Hydrography Dataset (NHD) 1:100,000 scale streams network.

Source: EPA Office of Water

Spatial Metadata: Streams

Date: 2005

Water Bodies

Description: Water bodies are area surface features such as ponds, lakes and wide rivers. The water bodies layer is from U.S. Census Bureau TIGER/Line 2000.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Spatial Metadata: Water Bodies

Date: 2000

Sole Source Aquifers

Description: EPA defines a sole or principal source aquifer as an aquifer that supplies at least 50 percent of the drinking water consumed in the area overlying the aquifer. These areas may have no alternative drinking water source(s) that could physically, legally and economically supply all those who depend on the aquifer for drinking water. For convenience, all designated sole or principal source aquifers are referred to as "sole source aquifers" (SSAs).

Source: Data.gov

Spatial Metadata: Sole Source Aquifers

Date: 2009

Watershed (HUC12)

Description: This data set is a complete digital hydrologic unit boundary layer to the Subwatershed (12-digit) 6th level for the entire United States.

Source: U.S. Department of Agriculture, Natural Resources Conservation Service

Spatial Metadata: Watershed (HUC12)

Date: 2009

Watershed (HUC8)

Description: This data set is a complete digital hydrologic unit boundary layer to Catalog Unit (8-digit) for the entire US.

Source: Hydrologic Catalog Units

Spatial Metadata: Watershed (HUC8)

Date: 2009

Boundaries

Zip Codes

Description: Zip Codes are numbers that identify each postal delivery area in the United States. The Zip Code boundaries layer is provided by Tele Atlas, 2008.

Source: Tele Atlas

Spatial Metadata: Zip Codes

Date: 2008

Congressional Districts

Description: 113th Congressional Districts. A congressional district is an electoral constituency that elects a single member of a congress. A congressional district is based on population, which in the United States is determined by taking a census every ten years.

Source: USGS National Atlas

Spatial Metadata: Congressional Districts

Date: 2013

City Boundaries

Description: City boundaries are derived from the 2000 U.S. Census Bureau TIGER/Line data. These boundaries include incorporated cities and Census Designated Places.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Spatial Metadata: City Boundaries

Date: 2000

Federal Lands

Description: Federal Lands are any land other than tribal lands that are controlled or owned by the United States, including lands selected by, but not yet conveyed to, Alaska Native Corporations and groups organized pursuant to the Alaska Native Claims Settlement Act of 1971. This layer is downloaded from the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS).

Source: U.S. Geological Survey

Spatial Metadata: Federal Lands

Date: 2006

Townships Boundary

Description: This data set portrays the Public Land Surveys of the United States, including areas of private survey, Donation Land Claims, and Land Grants and Civil Colonies. It is intended for geographic display and analysis at the national level, and for large regional areas. The data should be displayed and analyzed at scales appropriate for 1:2,000,000-scale data.

Source: U.S. Geological Survey

Spatial Metadata: Townships Boundary

Date: 2002

Counties

Description: The Counties layer portrays the county boundaries of the United States. A county is the largest territorial division for local government within a state in the United States. This map layer is downloaded from the U.S. Census Bureau.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Spatial Metadata: Counties

Date: 2000

States

Description: State boundaries are derived from 2000 U.S. Census Bureau TIGER/Line generalized boundaries for state and state equivalent areas.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

Spatial Metadata: States

Date: 2001

EPA Regions

Description: EPA Administrative Region boundaries derived from State boundaries

Source: EPA OEI

Spatial Metadata: EPA Regions

Date: 2002

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Demographics 2010 (ACS)

Based on data from the U.S. Census Bureau's 2006-2010 American Community Survey 5-year Summary (ACS). 2010 ACS data may not be displayed in certain areas of the United States (mainly U.S. Territories).

Spatial Metadata: Blockgroups

Spatial Metadata: Tracts

Spatial Metadata: Counties

Pop. Density (people/sq mi)

Description: Persons Per Square Mile is computed by dividing the total population count by the land area in square miles. Available by Blockgroup, Tract, and County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Per Capita Income

Description: Per Capita Income is computed by dividing the collective income for all persons 15 years and over by the total population count within the area. Available by Blockgroup, Tract, and County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Below Poverty (%)

Description: Percent Below Poverty is computed by dividing the sum of persons living below the poverty level by the number of persons for whom poverty status is determined. Available by Tract, and County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Education < 12G (%)

Description: The percentage of adults (25 years and older) who have not completed high school. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

HS Diploma Only (%)

Description: The percentage of adults (25 years and older) who have a high school diploma only. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

College Degree (%)

Description: The percentage of adults (25 years and older) who have a Bachelor's degree or above. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Age < 18 years (%)

Description: The percentage of population under 18 years old. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Homes pre-1950 (%)

Description: The percentage of home built before 1950. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Speak English < Well (%)

Description: Percent Speak English Less Than Well is computed by dividing the sum of population speaking English less than well with the sum of population. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Female (%)

Description: Percent Females is computed by dividing the female population by the total population. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Rental Units (%)

Description: Percent Rental Units is computed by dividing the number of rented housing units by the total number of occupied housing units. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

Minority (%)

Description: Percent Minority includes all race/ethnicities except non-Hispanic White persons. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau 5-year Estimates from the American Community Survey (ACS)

Date: 2006-2010

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Demographics 2000

Based on data from the 2000 U.S. Census of Population and Housing. The demographic elements are mapped using boundary layers (block, blockgroup, tract and county) derived from the U.S. Census Bureau's TIGER/Line 2000.

Spatial Metadata: Blocks

Spatial Metadata: Blockgroups

Spatial Metadata: Tracts

Spatial Metadata: Counties

Pop. Density (people/sq mi)

Description: Persons Per Square Mile is computed by dividing the total population count by the land area in square miles. Available by Block, by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3) for County, Tract, and Blockgroup levels. Block level statistics are based on U.S. Census Bureau PL-171 File for 2000.

Date: 2000

Per Capita Income

Description: Per Capita Income is computed by dividing the collective income for all persons 15 years and over by the total population count within the area. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Below Poverty (%)

Description: Percent Below Poverty is computed by dividing the sum of persons living below the poverty level by the number of persons for whom poverty status is determined. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Education < 12G (%)

Description: The percentage of adults (25 years and older) who have not completed high school. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

HS Diploma Only (%)

Description: The percentage of adults (25 years and older) who have a high school diploma only. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

College Degree (%)

Description: The percentage of adults (25 years and older) who have a Bachelor's degree or above. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Age < 18 years (%)

Description: The percentage of population under 18 years old. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Homes pre-1950 (%)

Description: The percentage of home built before 1950. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Speak English < Well (%)

Description: Percent Speak English Less Than Well is computed by dividing the sum of population speaking English less than well with the sum of population. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Female (%)

Description: Percent Females is computed by dividing the female population by the total population. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Rental Units (%)

Description: Percent Rental Units is computed by dividing the number of rented housing units by the total number of occupied housing units. Available by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3)

Date: 2000

Minority (%)

Description: Percent Minority includes all races except non-Hispanic white persons. Available by Block, by Blockgroup, by Tract, and by County.

Source: U.S. Census Bureau's Population and Housing Summary File 3 (SF3) for County, Tract, and Blockgroup levels. Block level statistics are based on U.S. Census Bureau PL-171 File for 2000.

Date: 2000

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Soil Survey Map

Description: USDA/NRCS SSURGO: This layer shows the Soil Survey Geographic (SSURGO) by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Natural Resources Conservation Service.

Source: USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

NWI Wetlands

Description: The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) is the principal Federal agency that provides information to the public on the extent and status of the Nation's wetlands. The Service's strategic plan for our vast national wetland data holdings is focused on the development, updating, and dissemination of wetlands data and information to Service resource managers and the public. The development of the Wetlands Master Geodatabase is in direct response to the need to integrate digital map data with other resource information to produce timely and relevant management and decision support tools. Wetlands provide a multitude of ecological, economic and social benefits. They provide habitat for fish, wildlife and a variety of plants. Wetlands are nurseries for many saltwater and freshwater fishes and shellfish of commercial and recreational importance. Wetlands are also important landscape features because they hold and slowly release flood water and snow melt, recharge groundwater, act as filters to cleanse water of impurities, recycle nutrients, and provide recreation and wildlife viewing opportunities for millions of people.

Source: USFWS Wetlands

Metadata: NWI Wetlands.

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

USA Topo Map

Description: This map presents land cover imagery for the world and detailed topographic maps for the United States. The map includes the National Park Service (NPS) Natural Earth physical map at 1.24km per pixel for the world at small scales, i-cubed eTOPO 1:250,000-scale maps for the contiguous United States at medium scales, and National Geographic TOPO! 1:100,000 and 1:24,000-scale maps (1:250,000 and 1:63,000 in Alaska) for the United States at large scales. The TOPO! maps are seamless, scanned images of United States Geological Survey (USGS) paper topographic maps.

Source: For more information on this map, click here.

Date: See source metadata by following the Source link above for the latest date information.

National Land Cover 2006

Description: Land cover is the physical material at the surface of the earth. Land covers include grass, asphalt, trees, bare ground, water, etc. Land cover is distinct from land use despite the two terms often being used interchangeably. Land use is a description of how people utilize the land and socioeconomic activity - urban and agricultural land uses are two of the most commonly recognized high-level classes of use. The land cover layer color scheme may seem slightly different in the map versus in the legend because the map layer has been turned into a transparency for easier viewing when overlaying with other datasets.

Source: U.S. Geological Survey National Land Cover Database

Spatial Metadata: NLCD 2006

Date: 2006

 

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